More About Alcolics Anonymous

Alcoholics Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their  experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from alcoholism.

The only requirement for AA membership is a desire to stop drinking. There are no dues or fees for AA membership; we are self-supporting through our own contributions.

AA is  not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization or institution; does not wish to engage in any controversy; neither endorses nor opposes any causes.

Our primary purpose is to stay sober and help other alcoholics achieve sobriety.

Copyright The AA Grapevine, Inc.

For Anyone New Coming to A.A.

The primary purpose of A.A. is to carry its message of recovery to the alcoholic seeking help. Almost every alcoholism treatment tries to help the alcoholic maintain sobriety. Regardless of the road we follow, we all head for the same destination, recovery of the alcoholic person.

Together, we can do what none of us could accomplish alone. We can serve as a source of personal experience and be an ongoing support system for recovering alcoholics.

How Does The AA Program Work?

  1. A.A. members share their experience with anyone seeking help with a drinking problem; they give person-to-person service or “sponsorship” to the alcoholic coming to A.A. from any source.
  2. The A.A. program, set forth in our Twelve Steps, offers the alcoholic a way to develop a satisfying life without alcohol.
  3. This program is discussed at A.A. group meetings.

About AA Meetings

Open speaker meetings are open to alcoholics and nonalcoholics. (Attendance at an open A.A. meeting is the best way to learn what A.A. is. At speaker meetings, A.A. members “tell their stories.” They describe their experiences with alcohol, how they came to A.A., and how their lives have changed as a result of Alcoholics Anonymous.

One member speaks briefly about his or her drinking experience, and then leads a discussion on A.A. recovery or any drinking-related problem anyone brings up. (Closed meetings are for A.A.s or anyone who may have a drinking problem.)

Closed discussion meetings — conducted just as open discussions are, but for alcoholics or prospective A.A.s only.

Step meetings (usually closed) — discussion of one of the Twelve Steps.